Community Announcements!

Community Announcements

Local promoter Samuel Thomas (Local Queen / Portland Queer Music Festival) has announced plans to create a new queer-centric and electronic music club in the longtime Rotture/Branx space. You’ve enjoyed his Pride parties and quarterly extravaganzas, imagine what’s going to happen with an all-queer, all-the-time space!

Rotture/Branx has announced they will be closing immediately, with most shows moving to alternate venues. The 315 SE 3rd location will undergo a remodel with an opening date of July 24 under the moniker Euphoria—a historical throwback to the space’s origins as an original Portland alternative nightlife space.

Euphoria will be Portland’s latest club focused on dance music, underground DJs, and drag talent: local, national, and international. On the heels of Stag, it’s very nice to see queer spaces opening—not closing—in the Rose City. Grand Opening headliners are Willam & Manila Luzon (both from RuPaul’s Drag Race). Friday, July 24, 8pm. Euphoria, 315 SE Third.

Find more information and keep up to date with the latest information on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Euphoria-Nightclub.

More great news for queer spaces: With the significant support of Portland’s Radical Faerie community, Emily Waterpony has opened Triumph Coffee at the site of the recently defunct 3 Friends, where the Faeries had held their Saturday Coffees for over 13 years. Let’s support Emily and help create a queer/ queer-friendly daytime space to hang out with our tribe. 201 SE 12th at Ash.

Next year’s theme and location are all set: Saturday, May 21, and the theme is The Walking Red. You heard it here first, children of Red Dress!
Next year’s theme and location are all set: Saturday, May 21, and the theme is The Walking Red. You heard it here first, children of Red Dress!

Red Dress Party recently offered their checks to charity, donating $4,000 to Our House and another $4,000 to Cascade AIDS Project. See, all that fun and partying and you still get to be a do-gooder. Next year’s theme and location are all set: Saturday, May 21, and the theme is The Walking Red. You heard it here first, children of Red Dress!

The Benefits of Gusbandry.” Take note: Love is so gay. At her debaucherous 40th birthday party, serial relationship-killer Jackie meets handsome and charming thirty-something River.Their ensuing adventures in self-medication, late-blooming, and questionable judgment lead them to discover a raucous new kind of “significant otherness.”

From The Advocate: “The Benefits of Gusbandry” follows a straight woman and gay man attempting to act like functioning adults, and having way too much fun in the process. On why she chose to tell this story via the web, Portland-based filmmaker Alicia J. Rose explains: “I’m kind of an early adopter, and I’m all for a format that has no rules. To me, there is no show right now that really encapsulates the beauty, the relationship, the reality, the fun, the insanity that really happens in a relationship between a woman and a gay man. I hope that you can all learn what a gay husband is, and maybe go out and find a ‘gusband’ of your own.”

Time is running out, so support their efforts today: http://www.seedandspark.com/studio/benefits-gusbandry.

Portland, Ore. electronic duo Microfilm released their fourth studio album, 1,000,000 Neon Hz this JulyThese ten tracks showcase a cleaner, leaner sound than their previous album AggroPastels, and pays tribute to the duo’s electropop heroes, a reverence for techno, a steady four-to-the-floor rhythm section, and a psychedelic eye on the dancefloor. The perfect set of summer dance anthems for your feet-moving and ear-occupying pleasure.

Take, for example: Song 1: “If You’re Waiting for That Kiss (You’ll Be Waiting for the Rest of Your Life)” (commentary from Matt Keppel of Microfilm): This is a great punchy, poppy opener for the album. Friend Pete Ellison likened it to “Basement Jaxx, if they were from Detroit.” I wanted the story to be a duet and thought of it as a kind of prequel to the Pet Shop Boys song “What Have I Done to Deserve This?” with Dusty Springfield; how this couple met originally before splitting apart. We needed a “Dusty” and fantastic soul belter April Brown fit the bill. A time-travelling prequel to an ’80s classic. Check out the gamelan sounds (the clangy, metallic percussion) that Matt Mercer used. Weird and cool. Stream the album by typing this link into your browser: https://soundcloud.com/microfilmmusic/sets/1-000-000-neon-hz/s-2LcvW. And go buy their album on iTunes and Bandcamp.

MacLaren, a men’s juvenile justice facility, houses 130 youth—one of the larger youth facilities in the state—who committed a crime and entered the corrections system before age 18, and who are currently age 12 through 25.
MacLaren, a men’s juvenile justice facility, houses 130 youth—one of the larger youth facilities in the state—who committed a crime and entered the corrections system before age 18, and who are currently age 12 through 25.

At a unique Pride celebration at MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility June 27 in Woodburn, Oregon, American Leadership Forum of Oregon Executive Director Kendall Clawson let incarcerated LGBTQ youth know that the outside world cares about their lives.

Clawson, former deputy chief of staff for Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber and Gov. Kate Brown as well as former Executive Director of Portland’s Q center, was an honored guest and speaker at the event. The facility was the first in the nation to offer a formal support group to LGBTQ-identified youth.

“It was really something amazing, something that (historically) just doesn’t happen,” Clawson said. “They put a lot of effort into making sure it was an event that was fun and safe for LGBT youth.”

Community groups and nonprofits including PFLAG, Transactive, Cascade AIDS Project and Pride Northwest came to table at the event.

MacLaren, a men’s juvenile justice facility, houses 130 youth—one of the larger youth facilities in the state—who committed a crime and entered the corrections system before age 18, and who are currently age 12 through 25.
“It’s the only facility with this mature a support group for gay, lesbian and trans youth,” said Joe O’Leary, Deputy Director of the Oregon Youth Authority. “We hope other facilities will follow suit.”

O’Leary said there is reason to think events like Pride could improve relationships and ultimately the recidivism rates for LGBTQ youth, although it’s too soon to come up with statistics.

“One of the most determinant factors in recidivism rates and success is rapport with counselors, staff and each other,” he said. “It’s about learning about and respecting each other as accepted human beings. Can I quantify it exactly right now? No, I wish I could. We know they have capacity to do great things if we’re able to steer them the right way.”

Oregon Youth Authority Communications Deputy Director CJ Drake offered a similar account. He said the LGBTQ group, called Two Spirits after a Native American concept of gender diversity, was started by the growth with the encouragement of staff.

“Anecdotally, and based on discussions I’ve had with the youth and I’ve had quite a few of them, the youth who are involved definitely feel it’s a positive force in their lives and allows them to discuss issues and concerns they have. That can only help them have more productive and crime-free members of society after they leave.”

But Clawson’s words to the 40 youth, parents and staff at the event emphasized the present. “You have created an amazing sense of community,” she told the crowd of about 40 youth, parents and OYA staff. “Today, know that you are loved. Know that today represents people who were always considered as ‘other’ and we matter. We don’t need to know you personally to be a part of a larger community that wants you to be your true, authentic selves.”

Clawson told PQ Monthly afterward that she wanted to convey that times have changed, and LGBTQ people have the ability to be recognized.

“Even in that space, there is the ability to create community,” she said. “A lot of people came out to support them. It was our way in which the community on the outside was able to show love and support to them on the inside—and send that message that we love them, we care about them and we support them.”

–Compiled by Daniel Borgen and Matt Pizzuti